African American Museum

The African American Museum in Philadelphia is the first institution built by a major United States city to house and interpret the life and work of African Americans. Our doors are open for your enjoyment and enlightenment five days a week. Visit us and experience the richness and vibrancy of African American heritage and culture come alive in four magnificent exhibition galleries filled with exciting history and fascinating art.

701 ARCH STREET ➤

 
 
 

American Philosophical Society

An eminent scholarly organization of international reputation, the American Philosophical Society promotes useful knowledge in the sciences and humanities through excellence in scholarly reseARCH, professional meetings, support of young scholars, publications, library resources, a museum and community outreach. This country’s first learned society, the APS has played an important role in American cultural and intellectual life for over 250 years.

104 SOUTH 5th STREET ➤

 
 
 

American Revolution Center

The Museum of the American Revolution will chronicle the full sweep of the war—the deadly struggle between British and American forces as well as the growth of the idea of independence.

3RD AND CHESTNUT STREETS ➤

 
 
 

Arch Street Meeting House

When Friends first came to Philadelphia in 1681, they gathered to worship in private homes until the first meeting house was built on the bank of the Delaware River. As the Meeting increased in size, it outgrew a succession of meeting houses until the present large house was built in 1804, on a site originally granted by William Penn as a Friends burying ground. The meeting house was built for this Monthly Meeting and for the holding of Yearly Meeting; these uses continue. In addition the building serves as a committee and conference center, and is visited by thousands of tourists each year.

4TH AND ARCH STREETS ➤

 
 
 

Benjamin Franklin’s Grave

Christ Church Burial Ground is one of America’s most interesting Colonial and Revolution-era graveyards, with 1,400 markers on two beautiful acres right in the heart of historic Philadelphia. The Burial Ground is the final resting place of some of our most prominent leaders including Benjamin Franklin and four other signers of the Declaration of Independence. This year the historic burial ground marks its 294TH year.

20 N. American STREET ➤

 
 
 

The Betsy Ross House

The well-known and loved historic story of Elizabeth Griscom, “Betsy” Ross, sewing the first Stars & Stripes is tightly woven into the colorful fabric of America’s rich history. The Betsy Ross House, the birthplace of the American flag, is alive with the sights and sounds of the 18th century.

239 ARCH STREET ➤

 
 
 

Bishop White House

The Bishop White House is the home of the Rev. Dr. William White, a beloved rector of Christ Church and St. Peter’s Church for many years. He was the first Episcopal Bishop of Pennsylvania, and lived in this house from the time it was built in 1787 until his death in 1836. White chose its location because it lay midway between the two churches he served. The house has been restored to reflect the lifestyle of upper-class Philadelphians during the late 18th century. Many of the items in the house actually belonged to the Bishop.

309 WALNUT STREET ➤

 
 
 

Carpenter’s Hall

Carpenters’ Hall is a treasure in historic Philadelphia. It hosted the First Continental Congress in 1774 and was home to Franklin’s Library Company, The American Philosophical Society, and the First and Second Banks of the United States.

320 CHESTNUT STREET ➤

 
 
 

Chemical Heritage Museum

Chemical Heritage Foundation’s staff and fellows study the past in order to understand the present and inform the future. We focus on the sciences and technologies of matter and materials and their effect on our modern world, in territory ranging from the physical sciences and industries, through the chemical sciences and engineering, to the life sciences and technologies. We collect, preserve, and exhibit historical artifacts. We engage communities of scientists and engineers. We tell the stories of the people behind breakthroughs and innovations.

315 CHESTNUT STREET ➤

 
 
 

Christ Church

Benjamin Franklin. Pioneer Alice. William Penn. Betsy Ross. George Washington. Absalom Jones. William White. Fanny Kemble. They, and so many more, come to life in the living history of a truly American church. See more than 300 years of vision, faith and courage at Christ Church in Philadelphia!

20 NORTH AMERICAN STREET ➤

 
 
 

Christ Church Burial Grounds

Christ Church Burial Ground is one of America’s most interesting Colonial and Revolution-era graveyards, with 1,400 markers on two beautiful acres right in the heart of historic Philadelphia. The Burial Ground is the final resting place of some of our most prominent leaders including Benjamin Franklin and four other signers of the Declaration of Independence. This year the historic burial ground marks its 294TH year.

ARCH STREET BETWEEN 4TH AND 5TH ➤

 
 
 

City Tavern

There is no other place in the world where you can experience authentic 18th century American culinary history. City Tavern’s primary mission is to interpret and deliver the culinary experience inspired by the customs and foods of 18th Century Colonial America.

138 SOUTH 2ND STREET AT WALNUT STREET ➤

 
 
 

National Constitution Center

The National Constitution Center is the Museum of We the People, America’s Town Hall, and a civic education headquarters dedicated to non-partisan constitutional education and debate.

525 ARCH STREET ➤

 
 
 

Elfreth’s Alley

Elfreth’s Alley — popularly known as “Our nation’s oldest residential STREET” – dates back to the first days of the eighteenth century. Twenty years after William Penn founded Pennsylvania and established Philadelphia as its capital, the town had grown into a thriving, prosperous mercantile center on the banks of the Delaware River.

126 ELFRETH’S ALLEY ➤

 
 
 

Fireman’s Hall Museum

Fireman’s Hall Museum, located in a restored firehouse in the heart of Philadelphia’s historic Old City district, is one of the nation’s premier fire museums. Here, the history and heroic moments of Philadelphia firefighting, both past and present, are celebrated through the museum’s exhibits, public programs and award ceremonies. Owned by the City of Philadelphia, the museum is operated by the Philadelphia Fire Department and supported by the Philadelphia Fire Department Historical Corporation.

147 NORTH 2ND STREET ➤

 
 
 

Free Quaker Meeting House

At the time of the American Revolution, there was a small group of Quakers in Philadelphia who rejected the pacifist tenets of their faith to support the War for Independence. This group formed the Religious Society of Free Quakers in 1781 and two years later built a brick Meeting House. Members of the Free Quakers included those who supported independence such as Colonel Timothy Matlack, Lydia Darragh, Betsy Ross, and Society founder Samuel Wetherill.

ARCH AND 5th STREETS ➤

 
 
 

Historic Philadelphia Center

Historic Philadelphia isn’t just a place. It’s an organization – dedicated to making our nation’s history relevant and real through interpretation, interaction and education, strengthening Greater Philadelphia’s role as the destination to experience American history.

150 SOUTH INDEPENDENCE MALL WEST ➤

 
 
 

Historic St. Georges United Methodist Church

Their museum houses artifacts and documents dating from the late 1700s. Exhibits include the handwritten journal of our first minister, Joseph Pilmoor, and a pulpit Bible that Francis Asbury brought from London to present to St. George’s. You can also see original Love Feast cups, membership tickets, and portraits of early church figures. The benches from the Prayer Meeting Society are still in use today in our Fellowship Hall, carrying tradition right into the present.

235 NORTH 4TH STREET ➤

 
 
 

Independence Hall

W,e hold these Truths to be self-evident, that all Men are created equal…
Independence Hall echoes these words. Nearby the old cracked Bell proclaims liberty. The spirit of Franklin is alive in his adopted city. Become part of America’s journey in discovering its past.

520 CHESTNUT STREET ➤

 
 
 

Liberty Bell Center

The Liberty Bell’s inscription: Proclaim LIBERTY throughout all the Land unto all the Inhabitants thereof Lev. XXV X By Order of the ASSEMBLY of the Province of PENSYLVANIA [sic] for the State House in Philada

MARKET STREET BETWEEN 5th and 6th STREETS ➤

 
 
 

Merchant’s Exchange Building

This monumental office building was designed by William Strickland and is an exquisite expression of the Greek Revival style, the first national American ARCHitectural style. The ideals of Greek democracy were attractive to citizens of the American Republic and provided the best model for American ARCHitects to emulate as a national style.

DOCK, 3RD, AND WALNUT STREETS ➤

 
 
 

Mikveh Israel

Congregation Mikveh Israel, “The Hope of Israel,” was founded in 1740 and is an unparalleled American Jewish Institution. It has a two-fold tradition that is the synthesis of the Spanish-Portuguese Jewish ritual and the ongoing development of the American Jewish community.

4TH STREET BETWEEN ARCH AND Market ➤

 
 
 

Mother Bethel A.M.E. Church

The Richard Allen Museum is one of the greatest treasures housed in Mother Bethel Church. The current exhibit was constructed under the leadership of the 50th pastor, Bishop Richard Franklin Norris. Since its opening some 20 years ago, the museum receives thousands of visitors a year from all over the world.

419 S 6th STREET ➤

 
 
 

National Liberty Museum

The National Liberty Museum is dedicated to preserving America’s heritage of freedom by fostering good character, civic responsibility and respect for all people. Visitors to the Museum take an inspirational walk through freedom, interacting with incredible stories of heroes and artwork that encourage them to find their own place in the story of liberty. Our core themes for young people and adults include leadership and good character; diversity and inclusion; peaceful conflict resolution; and civic engagement. Our primary artform is glass art, as it supports our mission to promote non-violence and acceptance of others by showing visitors that freedom is “fragile,” like glass.

321 CHESTNUT STREET ➤

 
 
 

National Museum of American Jewish History

The National Museum of American Jewish History, on Independence Mall in Philadelphia, presents educational programs and experiences that preserve, explore and celebrate the history of Jews in America. Its purpose is to connect Jews more closely to their heritage and to inspire in people of all backgrounds a greater appreciation for the diversity of the American Jewish experience and the freedoms to which Americans aspire.

101 SOUTH INDEPENDENCE MALL EAST ➤

 
 
 

Old First Reformed United Church of Christ

Founded by German immigrants in 1727, Old First Reformed United Church of Christ has been part of the fabric of Philadelphia for over 280 years.

151 NORTH 4TH STREET ➤

 
 
 

Old St. Augustine Church

The Augustinians have had a presence in the United States since 1796, when they first established St. Augustine Church. Established when Philadelphia was a young city in the new Republic, St. Augustine Church is located within the neighborhood currently deemed Old City, which is home to many of the well known historical sites in the city, including Independence Hall. In more recent years, the interior and exterior of the church have been used in the films, “The Sixth Sense” and “Shooter”.

243 NORTH LAWRENCE STREET ➤

 
 
 

Old St. Mary’s Church

Was the second Roman Catholic Church in Philadelphia. It was built in 1763 as a Sunday Church to be used by the parishioners of Old St. Joseph Church. It eventually became a parish in its own right. The church was prominent in the life of Colonial and Revolutionary Philadelphia.

252 SOUTH 4TH STREET ➤

 
 
 

Pemberton House

This building is a reconstruction of the one constructed by the Carpenters’ Company in 1791 and originally used to house the office of the first Secretary of War, Henry Knox, and his staff. Joseph Pemberton, a Quaker merchant, bought the property from the Carpenters’ Company and built a fine Georgian mansion, reflecting the status and ambition of its owner.

CHESTNUT STREET BETWEEN 3RD AND 4TH STREETS ➤

 
 
 

Philadelphia History Museum

The new Philadelphia History Museum showcases an array of historical objects, art, and artifacts that tell the story of Philadelphia, from its founding in 1680 to present day. The Museum features eight renovated galleries, containing stunning items from its vast holdings of over 100,000 objects, and provides various interactive elements to enhance the visitor experience. On view are items ranging from George Washington’s 1790s writing desk to Joe Frazier’s 1970s Championship boxing gloves. Visitors can also take a virtual tour of the city by walking on the world’s largest map of Philadelphia.

15 SOUTH 7TH STREET ➤

 
 
 

Physick House

The four-story brick house which features a spacious interior was built in 1786 by wealthy Madeira wine importer Henry Hill. It was the residence of Dr.Philip Syng Physick, “the father of American surgery”, after separating from his wife, Elizabeth Emlen Physick, in 1815, until his death in 1837.

321 SOUTH 4TH STREET ➤

 
 
 

Polish American Center

The Polish American Cultural Center and Museum Exhibit Hall are a focal point for many Polish American affairs in the greater Philadelphia area. Annually, more than one million tourists visit Philadelphia’s historic district. The Cultural Center’s Exhibit Hall, located in the heart of this district, and open to the general public 300 days a year, admission free, allows thousands of tourists to experience Polish history, culture and pride. In addition to welcoming tourists from around the world, the Center hosts meetings, lectures and other events to promote public awareness and appreciation of Polish heritage.

308 WALNUT STREET ➤

 
 
 

Second Bank of the US

The Second Bank of the United States was designed by ARCHitect William Strickland and built between 1819 and 1824 at the cost of nearly half-a-million dollars.1 Modeled after the Parthenon in Athens, this temple structure is one of the finest examples of Greek Revival ARCHitecture in the United States.

420 CHESTNUT STREET ➤

 
 
 

The Athenaeum

The Athenaeum was founded in 1814 to collect materials “connected with the history and antiquities of America, and the useful arts, and generally to disseminate useful knowledge” for public benefit. Annually the Athenaeum’s nationally significant collections attract thousands of readers: graduate students and senior scholars, ARCHitects, interior designers, museum curators, and private owners of historic buildings. It provides the Philadelphia region with a resource of first resort on matters of ARCHitecture and interior design history, particularly for the period 1800 to 1945.

219 SOUTH 6TH STREET ➤

 
 
 

Thomas Bond House

Built in 1769 by Dr. Thomas Bond, the four story house is historically significant as an important example of the classical revival “Georgian” style ARCHitecture. Dr. Bond built the original part of the residence in 1769. The ionic modillion cornice at the roof line is the most elaborate high feature of the building. Additions were made in 1824 and 1840.The house served as a residence until 1810. Until restored as a B&B in 1988, it also served as a stocking manufactory, leather tannery, leather goods manufacturer, rag supplier, customs broker and retail shop.

129 SOUTH 2ND STREET ➤

 
 
 

Todd House

The Todd House was built in 1775. It was occupied from 1791 -1793 by lawyer John Todd, and his wife Dolley Payne. Todd died during the 1793 yellow fever epidemic. Following her husband’s death, Dolley married James Madison, later to become the 4TH President of the United States. The couple subsequently moved to the Madison estate in Virginia. The Todd House reflects the lifestyle of 18th century Philadelphia’s middle class.

NORTHEAST CORNER OF 4TH AND WALNUT STREETS ➤

 
 
 

The President’s House

In the 1790s, at the President’s House location at Sixth and MARKET STREETS, Presidents George Washington and John Adams lived and conducted their executive branch business. Washington brought some of his enslaved Africans to this site and they lived and toiled with other members of his household during the years that our first president was guiding the experimental development of the young nation toward modern, republican government.

6TH AND MARKET STREETS ➤